Sailing….

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Whether for the pleasure of it or to engage the enemy, sailing in a Tall Ship has been an adventure for centuries. The adventure has been diluted, I believe, by floating cities that have movie theaters that you can try to enjoy with thousands of your shipmates. Not for me.

 

I started a blog at starclipper.wordpress.com that will tell the story

 

Great Blue Heron -The Complete (Almost) Flight

All I had was a point and shoot Olympus SZ14 but it has a fairly high burst rate.  It was enough to capture most of the flight of a Great Blue Heron that was about 35 ft. in front of me to a point 50 yards behind me at my 7:00 o’clock.  I kept the zoom factor low so I could keep the bird in the frame most of the time, which worked but the resolution wasn’t high.

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Blue Mooney approaching Fisk, rock your wings

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Flying to the annual EAA fly-in at Oshkosh is an adventure but it isn’t too bad if you prepare for it. With 10,000 or more planes in the area, the tower becomes the busiest in the world and pilots wanting to land there must know what to expect. I flew there three years in a row and had no problems but just about every year planes crash mostly when landing or taxiing.  

Basically, pilots are expect to maintain a specific heading and speed, monitor different frequencies at different times, follow landmarks such as railroad tracks, maintain 1/2 mile separation from the plane in front, acknowledge tower instructions by rocking their wings – not talking, watch for other aircraft, land on a specific runway, and land on the designated painted spot on that runway. 

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The diagram above shows the path taken to land on Rwy 27, which I did twice, Rwy 36 once.

 

 

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After I left Fisk, Holly took this photo of the field which shows Rwy 9/27 (on the left side of the photo)  which is the runway I’ll be landing on.  But first, I head north past the runway, turn east for the downwind leg, then out over the lake for the base leg, then west for the final leg.

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Now I’m heading due north and will be turning east in a few seconds and fly parallel to the runway I’ll be landing on.  I will park where all the planes are parked to the right of the runway.

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I’m over the lake and the tower already told me where to land on the runway – at the red spot right in the middle.  When I touched down, there was a plane taxiing in front of me and a plane landing at the end of the runway behind me. If you want to know what all this sounds like, listen to the You Tube video on the previous post.